6 Types Of Leaders To Avoid Becoming

January 25, 2017

Even though being a manager and a leader can go hand-in-hand, they are two separate rolls in a business setting.

According to The Wall Street Journal, a "managers job is to plan, organize, and coordinate. The leader's job is to inspire and motivate." Think back at all the great leaders you've interacted or worked with in the past. What qualities and characteristics made them a great leader? Why are they memorable to you?

Being in a leadership role can be challenging and demanding, but it can also extremely rewarding. Regardless of if you are part of a large organization or if you are a small business owner, there is always room to grow within that leadership position.

One way to grow is to be aware of if you are picking up bad habits. Another is to be conscious of if you are doing things that are negatively impacting the workplace or relationships with co-workers. Not only will that affect the relationship at the office, but it can affect the relationship with clients and interfere with your brand reputation.

Below are six things that you should avoid doing on a day-to-day basis to ensure that you are being a good role model and a effective leader. 

Avoid Being a Leader Who ...

Is Closed Minded

The worst thing a leader can be is set in their ways. Not being open to trying new things - and not being open to new ideas - can cause tension in the workplace. It also limits your business and doesn't allow it to reach its full potential. Always strive to be as open-minded as possible and willing to try new things. You never know when you can learn, or try, something new. 

Is Inconsistent

Being consistent in a leadership role is important because it can set the tone for how you are perceived by your co-workers. Some examples of being consistent: arriving to work at the same time every day, treating everyone with equal respect, keeping a professional demeanor even during stressful situations, always remaining positive, and staying disciplined at all times. 

Being consistent also goes hand-in-hand with how you are perceived by your customers. Being consistent with a customer is a vital component to providing premium service because with consistency, the customer always know what to except. As motivation speaker, Jim Rohn, once said, " Success is neither magical nor mysterious. Success is the natural consequence of consistently applying basic fundamentals."

Under or Over-delegates All Work Tasks

It is important to find a happy medium when delegating tasks to employees. As a leader, you don't want to under-delegate and do all the work yourself because that doesn't get everyone involved. You also don't want to over-delegate and make your employees do everything. Figure out what works for you and find a balance. 

Doesn't Respect or Show Appreciation

Not only do you want to respect and WOW your customers - which includes offering them customer delight, of course - but you want to also respect and show appreciation for your fellow coworkers. This can be something as simple as a thank-you email.

Showing respect for your coworkers also includes paying them what they deserve. Know their worth and pay then appropriately. If you are ever unsure as to the correct amount to pay employees, it's always best to do your research. You can also reference sites like Payscale, Indeed, and Comparably. 

Can't Handle Constructive criticism

Even though you are in a leadership position, there is always room to grow. Make sure to always be open to constructive criticism from not only co-workers, but also from customers. 

Has Poor Communication Skills

This is one of the most important tips to remember when you are in a leadership role. Always make sure to effectively communicate, keep the lines of communication open, and make sure that you interact with everyone in an open and honest way. When it comes to communication skills, also remember that communication is verbal and non-verbal. Always be aware of both throughout your day. 

 

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